Health and Medicine Archives - 500 Ways

Physical Pain and NLP

What about physical pain? Can NLP help with that? Yes! You don’t even have to know NLP. The techniques are explained right here.

Here’s a two-part system for dealing with physical pain that works most of the time. This is written as if you want to use it on yourself, but it works great when you use it on others, too. And, like all of NLP, you don’t have to do it exactly right. Just get it approximately right, and do it with the right spirit. It will still work fine.

Part 1: It helps to understand that pain is not bad. It is a message system. It’s your body’s way of telling your conscious mind, “hey, we’ve got to take care of something,” that your conscious mind might otherwise disregard.

Using the parts of yourself that know how to do it, let your body tell you all about the pain. Really listen to the message. You may be surprised by what your body wants you to know. In some cases, such as a sprained ankle, the message may be simple, “You’ve got to keep your weight off that ankle so it can heal.”

A message like that can’t be argued with. And, you wouldn’t want that pain to go away, because you probably would walk on it, which would indeed interfere with the healing.

The message may be, “seek medical help.” OK, that’s the way to take care of this pain. If you get that message, skip the rest of this chapter for now and get that medical help, you can come back to this later.

Once you have listened to your pain message, you can work out a solution that your body can accept. For instance, “How about if the pain can be gone as long as I don’t walk on it?”

Be ready for really interesting messages. And, you may have to be inventive to come up with an acceptable deal.

Part 2: Did you know you can change pain? If the pain is sharp, like a knife, try making it duller. Or if it is dull, sharpen it a bit. So, if you can change that, what else can you change? Go ahead and experiment. How about the size of the painful area? The depth? Does it have a frequency? A sweetness? If you’ve never tried adjusting the submodalities of pain, you might be quite surprised how easy it is, once you get the knack of it.

If you are working with someone else, and they aren’t able to change the submodalities of their pain, you might take a break for a minute, and let them learn that they can learn new things of this sort. Try this: Have them learn to inhale deeply, by asking them to exhale forcefully and fully. To their delight, the deep inhalation then comes automatically. Then go back to adjusting the pain.

Oh, and an aside: Referring to it as “their pain,” gives them ownership of it. I don’t think they really want to own ‘their’ pain.

Now, the most interesting submodality of pain is location. Can you move one inch higher? To the left? So, if you can move it an inch, how about further? How about putting it in another part of your body? How about somewhere outside your body? Isn’t that a nice solution? When it’s outside your body, you can still have the safety of the awareness that it exists, but it doesn’t have to bother you any more.

New Chemicals

In 1965, the CAS Chemical Registry System listed 211,934 synthetic chemicals. In 2006, that number rose to 88,758,285 and it’s still growing. Many of the chemicals are in products you use everyday from cosmetics to plastic toys.

Many soak through our skin or are breathed in and can be detected inside our bodies. For instance, researchers sprayed the common household oil, WD-40, on volunteers’ fingertips, and detected it in their blood five minutes later.

The average American male has a sperm count 75% lower than 40 years ago. Could this be partially due to these chemicals?

The Extent of Human Capacity

We remember one trillion things in our lifetime.

Computer scientists say our brains have a storage capacity approximately the same as an 11-terabyte hard drive, which with current solid-state technology can be stored in an area about the size of a fingertip.

Our eyes are each equivalent to a 137-megapixel camera, roughly ten times higher resolution than a typical modern digital camera.

These comparisons are a bit rough, because humans are made from wetware, not hardware. For instance, the retina has much greater sensitivity near the center than at the edges, while a camera has uniform sensitivity. The memory of a hard drive is digital. Each ‘cell’ in a hard drive can hold a one or a zero. Each cell in the human brain is more of an analog mechanism, firing or not based on many input factors.

Colorblindness Test and Exercise

Instructions:

You can run this program to find out whether you are colorblind. Approximately 12% of males are colorblind. Although fewer, millions of women are also. And if you are colorblind, you can play with this a few minutes a day as an exercise to discern colors better.

The colors Continue reading “Colorblindness Test and Exercise”

Naturalist – Naturist

These two similar words can have vastly different meanings. A naturalist is one who studies or appreciates nature. A naturist can be nearly the same thing: One who appreciates beauty in nature. However a naturist can also be one who enjoys going without clothes whenever proper opportunities come up. There can be a sexual side to naturism, but more often it is practiced as a way to be more ‘natural.’ Naturism can be a very freeing experiece for one who has spent most of life covered in cloth. Many claim health benefits, feeling a reaonable amount of sunshine over one’s entire body is more beneficial than exposing only some portions of the body to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation. A growing body of evidence suggests most of us don’t get enough vitamin D. However, some scientists are now saying as much exposure as one can get to sunlight will not give us optimum vitamin D. On the other hand, too much tanning can be bad for one’s health also. Go figure!

Public domain via Wikimedia Commons